September Newsletter 2020

President's Report

September 2020

Work in the shed is progressing well. A new 8 inch jointer has been ordered. This will allow us to dress wider pieces of timber. Members still need to check any timber that is put through machines. I had only just replaced the blades in the jointer a few weeks ago. Someone then took 2 chips out through not checking for nails. This is most frustrating. Not only do we have to pay to have the blades reground. It is about an hour to replace and reset the new blades. They have to be set. They cannot just be screwed in. The nail detector is very sensitive. (A lot like me.) You need to check and see that it is adjusted before using it. If you don’t know how, please ask. Not only the nail detector. If you are unsure of any tools please ask. Especially circular saws. If you want to cut something a little unusual. Come and see me. I would rather spend some time with you, explain something, than time trying to replace a finger.

If something is rubbish - dispose of it. If you don’t know what is rubbish, again ask. I was looking for a tin of stain. I found one. No stain in the tin, no lid on the tin. WHY WOULD YOU PUT IT BACK ON THE SHELF?
A plastic dish in the store room. 2 holes in it. Can anyone tell me what you would use it for? Throw it out.
6 INCH LONG PIECES OF TIMBER DON’T GO BACK ON THE RACKS. Come on guys. This sort of thing is so disappointing.

We had an incident recently. A member claimed the Committee was unapproachable. I don’t believe this. I have requested Ray our media magnate to include the list of Committee members In this News Letter. We even have some member’s photos on the wall in the kitchen. If you want to ask or put in a suggestion please do.

On the occasion of our workshop meeting at smoko. It is not one way. If you want to say something that is a great opportunity.


Personally I am very pleased the way our shed operates. I know we have minor items that need attention,
but I don’t know of any business or organisation that doesn’t. As long as we communicate and try our best that is all I can ask for. I think we have not only a great facility but a great bunch of members.

Keep up the good work and  the interaction with each other. Also remember we still fall within the Covid-19 pandemic. Stay safe.

President Tom Skinner

From the Manager's Desk

G'day Shedders, I hope Covid is not disrupting your life too much and you are all keeping as well as can be expected. We are still very busy catching up on jobs from the shut down, but Tom and the guys are working their butts off to catch up, and we have more work coming in to keep us going for a long while.

A reminder that JOB SHEETS must be done BEFORE work starts, and jobs paid for before leaving the shed.

Peter Jackson is doing a sterling job of disinfecting the shed every morning before the late shift gets in, help him by keeping the place clean and tidy, cups and plates washed and PUT away after use.

Please be aware when leaving the shed that cyclists use the track from Victoria St, down to our entry, please give them a wide berth when passing them on Howard Street. 

We have not had many entries for the new shed logo, please have a go at designing one, doesn't need to be a Leonardo DaVinci drawing, a rough sketch I can work with into a passable logo would be great. Get your thinking caps on - a $50 Bunnings gift card is on offer for the one chosen.

Have a great month
Robert Houston
Manager ( Voluntary)

General News

  • Jim Cleal and Neville Colligan are in need of our support and best wishes as they battle health issues.
  • Beware of a scam phone call from Service NSW as their database was hacked this past week. Hang up immediately!
  • The Committee would like to remind all members that they are welcome to 'sit in' on Committee Meetings as a guest. Shed Managers can arrange a seat for the next meeting. As a guest you will be invited to have a say, but not to vote on issues. The Committee wants members to understand that the process of running the shed is an open process and all input by members is welcome and appreciated. Below is the list of Committee Members.

Committee 2020

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

President: Tom Skinner
Vice President: Ken Ryan
Secretary: Tony Winter
Treasurer: Garth Howard


GENERAL COMMITTEE

David Churchyard
Robert Houston
Peter Jackson
Ken Howe
Glenn Cox
Warren Sanger


OPERATIONAL MANAGERS

Shed Managers & Office Administration:

Robert Houston
David Churchyard


Health & Welfare Officers:

David Churchyard
Ken Howe


Woodwork Shop:

Tom Skinner


Metalwork / Engineering:

Peter Jackson


Information Technology / Website / Media:

Ray Meyer

Great Garage Sale


The garage sale on Saturday 5th September turned out to be a bumper, with over 100 visitors to the shed. Garage sales have been quite sparse due to Covid-19, so with a lovely spring day, locals hit the streets looking for a bargain. The Shed had a lot to offer, and with sales prior to the garage sale day, we put over $3,000 back into our coffers. Quite a few members attended to the days duties, with a Covid Marshall on duty all morning, collecting signatures and keeping visitors steered in the right direction.

Thanks to all involved, especially Doug Tysoe for his efforts in preparing the goods for sale.


Best to start the day on a full stomach


No-one was safe from the Covid Marshall


All sorts of goods were walking out the door


So much to sell, so little space


spilling out into the spring sunshine


time to go home...

Grant from Park Beach Bowling Club

PBBC CEO Thane Duncan presenting the cheque to Tom Skinner and Ken Ryan.
Photo David Tune

On Thursday 27th August Park Beach Bowling Club visited the Shed, and generously donated $2,500 to the Coffs Harbour Men's Shed. Emma Foster, Functions Co-ordinator at PBBC, sent this pic with a thank you note, expressing her gratitude for showing their representatives "where the magic happens". 

We are very grateful for these donations which carry the shed forward in many ways. The money, provided through the NSW Clubs Grant scheme, will be used to purchase a new nine inch planer joiner machine to replace the current six inch machine that has been in service for many years.

Logo Design Competition

This is the current logo for the Coffs Harbour Men's Shed. It was designed By our manager Robert and has been used over the years as our primary logo.

The Shed now is conducting a competition for a new logo design. It doesn't have to be polished, or colour accurate, but could be innovative, a play on the initials, a better graphic underneath etc. We are offering a $50 Bunnings Gift Voucher to whoever comes up with a clever, usable design. The competition will run for a few months but will be decided upon when a suitable logo is submitted, or time runs out.

If you have something to suggest, or a design to submit, send it to Robert at the shed, or to me (Ray) using the links below.

Happy drawing...


Robert's Email

Ray's Email


Computers get updated

After a generous donation recently, the 2 Windows computers in the office have been replaced with new PC's supplied by local company TechAddicts in Moonee Street.


The redundant computers will be cleaned, both physically and digitally, and be reborn as training computers for members. When setup, shedders will be asked to join groups to learn about email techniques, and internet surfing. Other more technical questions will be answered by Ray Meyer and Garth Howard.

Shed running at full steam

Visit the shed on any Thursday, and you will witness most benches and machines being fully utilised. On Thursday 20th August we had a full house, with a beautiful Coffs Harbour winters day keepin everyone warm and active.


Busy Shed












What's happening behind the orange curtain?


Another horse getting the artisitc treatment. Great job by Graham Everlyn.

Ship Ahoy with Ken Ryan

Did you know how busy Ken has been? In a recent interview Ken revealed a passion that would surprise most of us.

"After I retired in Coffs Harbour in 2003, I didn't have much to do, so I looked for a hobby I could do with my hands, and model ship building would be an angle I could take."

Ken built a loft above his garage to accommodate his hobby. Kits come with many prefab parts, but also some manufacturing had to be carried out eg lengths of timber needed to be trimmed or cut to exact plans. A Dremmel tool came in very handy as most parts are tiny and intricate.

Ken researched model ship building on the net, found a source for parts and plans, started with a simple one, and gradually worked his way up to the "HMS Victory" (below). This intricate model took 2 years to complete. Other great finished models are also shown below with statistics.

"I haven't had the urge to start a new project as I am tied up with the Men's Shed now which takes most of my free time."

This is evidenced by how much Ken has committed himself to the Coffs Harbour Shed, amongst other volunteer activities. He can be seen on almost any day working on electrical items, repairing, fixing, updating, generally keeping these items safe for use. Ken has spent many years now on the Committee, with 2 years as President.



HMS VICTORY
(Model Scale 1:78)

The model of HMS VICTORY was built from plans and took 2 years to build.


HISTORY OF HMS VICTORY
This Victory is the 5th ship of the Royal Navy to bear this name.
1st Victory launched in 1559 of 800 tons. Flagship at defeat of Spanish Amada.
2nd Victory launched in 1620 of 875 tons. Took part in Dutch Wars 1662-1667.
3rd Victory launched in 1675 of 1486 tons. Took part in Battle of Barfleur 1692.
4th Victory launched in 1737 of 1920 tons. Lost with all hands in the Channel in 1744.
5th Victory:
1759 – Keel laid.
1765 – Completed
1778 – Commissioned as flagship of Admiral Keppel
1782 – Flagship of Admiral Howe at the relief of Gibraltar
1793 – Flagship of Lord Hood Commander-in-Chief, Mediterranean
1797 – Flagship of Admiral Sir John Jervis at Cape St Vincent
1800 – 1803 – The “Great Repair”
1803 – Sails for Mediterranean as Nelson’s flagship
1805 – Battle of Trafalgar. Death of Nelson.
1808 – 1812 – Flagship for campaigns in the Baltic
1824 – 1889 - Flagship of the Port Admiral at Portsmouth
1922 – Brought in to dry dock for preservation.
1928- Opened to the public

Facts and Figures

Overall length: ...................................................69.2m (227ft)
Length on gun deck:...........................................56.7m (186ft)
Beam:..........................................................................16m (52ft)
Bowsprit:...................................................................36m (110ft)
Fore mast:................................................................55m (182ft)
Main mast:..............................................................62m (205ft)
Mizzen mast:............................................................46m (152ft)
Main yard:..................................................................31m (102ft)
Displacement:..............................3,600 tonnes (3,500 tons)
Max speed:......................................................... knots (9 mph)
Cost of construction:......................................................£63,176
Armament at Trafalgar:......Lower deck: 30 X 32-pounders
Middle deck:.................................................28 X 24-pounders
Upper deck:..........................................30 X long 12-pounders
Quarter deck:.......................................12 X short 12-pounders
Forecastle:...................................2 X 68 pounder carronades
............................................................2 X medium 12 pounders

Crew at Trafalgar:...........................................821, made up of: 

11 officers including Nelson, 48 non-commissioned officers
(including master, bosun, surgeon, gunner, carpenter, purser, cook, and 22 midshipmen.
80 petty officers, 204 able seamen, 195 ordinary seamen, 90 landsmen, 40 boys,
4 Royal Marine officers and 149 Marines.



THERMOPYLAE
(Model Scale 1:124)

Launched..........August 19 1868
Type..................................Clipper
Length.................................212ft.
Breadth................................36ft.
Depth...........................20ft. 9in.
Gross Tonnage....................947

On her maiden voyage, THERMOPYLAE sailed to Melbourne in just 60 days, pilot to pilot, via Shanghai and Foochow, breaking records on each leg of the journey – only steamers had previously matched such speeds.

The CUTTY SARK was built the following year to compete with THERMOPYLAE in bringing back the new season’s tea from China, although THERMOPYLAE twice beat her in the race. Her record day’s run was 380 statute miles, a feat exceeded by no sailing ship before.

In the 1890’s, after more than two decades as a China tea clipper and then an Australian wool clipper, THERMOPYLAE was sold by her Aberdeen owners to a Canadian company. She was put on the rice and timber carrying trade between Rangoon and Vancouver. Despite shortened masts and being cut down to a barque rig in July 1893 and her crew reduced from 35 to 20 men, she continued to make speedy passages. On one occasion she crossed the Pacific in 29 days, a world record at that time, and on another kept level for three days with the Canadian Pacific steam liner EMPRESS OF INDIA, which was capable of 16 knots.



THE HARVEY
(Baltimore Clipper Model Scale 1:58)


All clippers were approximately 100 feet in length from stern to bow. Baltimore Clippers had heart shaped midsections with short keels and raking sterns.

Clipper ships were designed and built to sail at high speeds. They were used in a number of different circumstances during the American War of Independence, and later for the opium and slave trades. After 1848, on the discovery of gold in California, they were converted into passenger transport ships.

The clipper ships, such as the HARVEY, not only transported gold seekers but also business men, supplies and tools to the new, rich lands of California. It was a voyage that could last as little as 89 days from New York to San Francisco, via Cape Horn.

To begin with the clippers only sailed under 2 masts, but as the demand for speed increased, they were built with 3 masts, carrying a sail surface area of 4000 sq.m.

The remorseless march of progress however would eventually bring about the decline of these majestic and graceful vessels. The invention of steam ships and the railways, along with the opening of the Suez and Panama canals brought an end to their economic viability.



“A SCHOONER FOR PORT JACKSON”
(Model Scale: 1:50)




Length 98ft. 6in.

In September 1788, only 8 months after the founding of the new colony on the shores of Port Jackson – now better known as Sydney Harbour, Governor Arthur Phillip sent a message to his superiors in England:- “…. the settlement on Norfolk Island and the extent of this harbour will render two vessels of thirty to forty tons of infinite service to this settlement. I presume they might be sent out in frame, but it will be necessary to send a few shipwrights to put them together, and who, as well as a mast maker….. will be of great service.”

Almost 2 years later, bearing in mind at least 12 months round trip from Australia to England, came the message:-
“………you will receive by the ship, PITT, a vessel in frame, which, when set up will, I have no doubt, be found extremely useful to you……………..”

The PITT sailed from England on 17th July 1791 with the first “vessel in frame” which when constructed was named FRANCIS.



GOLDEN HIND
(Model Scale: 1:72)


Golden Hind was a ship of Sir Francis Drake during his circumnavigation of the globe between years 1577-1580. Original name of the ship Pelican but Drake renamed her just during the voyage in 1578. There are no available original plans or construction drawings of the Golden Hind but it is supposed that the ship was about 25 meters long and had about 120 tons displacement. The ship was armed by 18 guns of various calibres. This ship model was basically reconstructed after pictures of Golden Hind on Hondius' map of the world from 1595.

Around the Shed

Doug's restoring a rusted toolbox. Seen here removing the steel rusted base.


Making a new bench top for his daughter's kitchen


Any clue as to what this is - or was?


Correct. It's a desk made from a surf boat.



The start of a bread display cabinet

Meet Ron Naylor

Shedder Ron Naylor is making mounts for the spare wheels for his caravan. Middle pic shows the raw block of 10mm thick steel, sitting on the lathe, ready to turn.

Ron is a fairly new member (12 Months) of the Shed. He is retired, married, with 4 children, and 8 grand children. Moving here 19 months ago from Bankstown in Sydney, Ron has discovered the appealing nature of our regional city, with less stress, friendlier people and less traffic. Shedding is not new to Ron, as he was a member of the Bankstown Mens Shed for over 5 years. While the Coffs Shed is bigger, with more machinery, Ron said the spirit in the 2 sheds was very similar.



Meet Graeme Hays

Graeme is new to the shed, having joined only 4 months ago. Given the Covid19 restrictions Graeme hasn't really had a lot of time in the Shed. So far he loves it.

Graeme's family goes all the way back to the First Fleet, where two convicts, a seaman and his wife are his ancestors. They were sent to Norfolk Island where they became farmers. When Norfolk was shut down, they moved to Tasmania and settled, hence Graeme's link. Graeme moved to Sydney in 1979 with his family, and retired in 2000. He then moved to Redhead near Newcastle for some quiet beach fishing and a few bowls at the local. With family in Coffs, Graeme and his wife finally settled in our beautiful Coffs Harbour.

Formally a Senior Manager in the Commonwaelth Development Bank and a State Manager, Graeme mainly worked with farmers. Graeme has gone from lending money to build houses, to making houses for birds and possums, for sale in the Shed Shop.

Thanks for your hard work and effort.

Graeme's possum house

Supporters of the Coffs Harbour Men's Shed

The Coffs Harbour Community Men's Shed wishes to thank all our supporters, both large and small,
for their ongoing support and generous donations of time and money.